Footnotes

1.

Talmud: (from the Hebrew, to “study”) A written compendium of oral law completed by about the fifth century and comprised of the Mishnah and the Gemara, a commentary on the Mishnah. The Talmud exists in two versions: the Jerusalem and the Babylonian.

2.

Mishnah: (from the Hebrew, to “repeat”) The body of Jewish oral law: specifically, the collection of oral laws compiled by Rabbi Judah the Prince in the second century.

3.

Huldah is the only Jerusalemite prophetess mentioned in the Bible during the period of the monarchy (See 2 Kings 22:14–20). King Josiah consulted her when he sent to “inquire of the Lord” concerning the Book of the Law (which most scholars consider to be the book of Deuteronomy) that was found during his restoration of the Temple in about 621 B.C.

4.

Tosephta: (from the Aramaic, to “add”) a work which is parallel and supplemental to the Mishnah. The text of the Tosephta often provides variant readings to the Mishnah.

Endnotes

1.

Babylonian Talmud, Succah 51b.

2.

Natural History, V, XV, 70.

3.

Antiquities of the Jews. XV, 412.

4.

Mishnah Sanhedrin, 11, 2.