Footnotes

1.

aSee Ephraim Stern, “How Bad Was Ahab?” BAR 19:02.

Endnotes

1.

1The Harvard Expedition was followed in 1931–1935 by the so-called Joint Expedition made up of a consortium of five institutions: Harvard, the London-based Palestine Exploration Fund, the British Academy, the British School of Archaeology in Jerusalem and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. However, the Joint Expedition’s excavation did not connect to the area excavated by Harvard in the vicinity of the palace and so did not contribute to our knowledge regarding the palace’s layout or function.

2.

2Lawrence E. Stager, “Shemer’s Estate,” Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research 277/278 (1990), pp.93–107.

3.

3I disagree with the Harvard excavators who believed that Ahab built the larger palace of Building Period II. In my view, Building Period II belongs to a much later period well after the demise of the Omride dynasty.

4.

4M. Bayliss, “The Cult of Dead Kin in Assyria and Babylonia.” Iraq 35 (1973), pp. 115–125.

5.

5R.S. Ellis, Foundation Deposits in Ancient Mesopotamia (New Haven and London: Yale Univ. Press, 1968).

6.

6Y. Al-Khalesi, “The Bī¯t Kispim in Mesopotamian Architecture: Studies of Form and Function,” Mesopotamia XII (1977), pp. 53–81.

7.

7W. Andrae, Das Wiedererstandene Assur (Leipzig: Hinrichs Verlag, 1938).

8.

8J. Oates and D. Oates, Nimrud—An Assyrian Imperial City Revealed (British School of Archaeology in Iraq, 2001).