Footnotes

1.

“ki” is an unpronounced determinative indicating that the name which precedes it is the name of a city, building, or region.

2.

Biblica, 60 (1979), 461–490.

3.

The work of such scholars as Herman Kees, Ancient Egypt, a Cultural Topography (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1961) and Jac. Janssen, Commodity Prices from the Ramesside Period (Leiden: Brill, 1975) stands out as notable exceptions.

5.

See the following BAR articles: Adam Zertal, “Has Joshua’s Altar Been Found on Mt. Ebal?” BAR 11:01; Aharon Kempinski, “Joshua’s Altar—An Iron Age I Watchtower,” BAR 12:01; Zertal, “How Can Kempinski Be So Wrong!” BAR 12:01; Hershel Shanks, “Two Early Israelite Cult Sites Now Questioned,” BAR 14:01.

7.

John D. Currid, “Puzzling Public Buildings,” BAR 18:01.

Endnotes

1.

Morton Smith, “Goodenough’s Jewish Symbols in Retrospect,” Journal of Biblical Literature, Vol. 86, 1967, pp. 53–68. Jacob Neusner, Early Rabbinic Judaism (E. J. Brill).

2.

Zeitschrift des Deutschen Palastina-Vereins, Vol. 70 (1954), pp. 135–141, and Tel Aviv, Vol. 1 (1974), pp. 26–32.

3.

Annual of the American Schools of Oriental Research, Vol. 39 (1968).

4.

Qedem, Vol. 10 (1979) and “Excavating Anthropoid Coffins in the Gaza Strip,” BAR 02:01.

5.

Encyclopedia of Archaeological Excavations in the Holy Land, Vol. II, p. 395.

6.

Biblical Archeologist, Vol. 28 (1965), pp. 2–10.

7.

Shaye J. D. Cohen, “Masada Literary Tradition, Archaeological Remains, and the Credibility of Josephus,” Journal of Jewish Studies 33 (1982), pp. 385–405. A popular version of this article appeared in Moment: Cohen, “What Really Happened at Masada,” July/August 1988.