Footnotes

3.

The reading suggested by author John Wilkinson appears to me to be clearly wrong. He would read DDM.NOMIMUS. But the IV cannot be M. The letter I clearly follows the M. The letter following D cannot be D; on the contrary, it must be O. See Wilkinson, “The Inscription on the Jerusalem Ship Drawing,” PEQ 127 (1995).

Endnotes

1.

F.M. Cross, “The Development of the Jewish Scripts,” in The Bible and Ancient Near East, ed. by G.E. Wright (Garden City, New York: Doubleday, 1961).

2.

P.R.S. Moorey,

3.

Naomi Shepherd, The Zealous Intruders (San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1987).

4.

For an overview of the survey, see Philip Mayerson, “Some Observations on the Negev Archaeological Survey,” Israel Exploration Journal 46 (1996), pp. 100–107.

5.

Diane Favro, The Urban Image of Augustan Rome (New York: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1996).

6.

Josephus, The Jewish War 1.165–167; Jewish Antiquities 14.87 89.

7.

Gu¬nther Garbrecht and Jehua Peleg, “The Water Supply of the Desert Fortresses in the Jordan Valley,” Biblical Archaeologist 57 (1994), pp. 161–170.

8.

Reinhard Förtsch, “The Residences of King Herod and Their Relations to Roman Villa Architecture,” in Klaus Fittschen and Gideon Foerster, eds., Judaea and the Greco-Roman World in the Time of Herod in the Light of Archaeological Evidence, Abhandlungen der Akademie der Wissenschaften in Göttingen, philologisch-historische Klasse, 3rd ser., vol. 215 (Göttingen:Vandenhoeck and Ruprecht, 1996), pp. 73–119.

9.

Josephus, Jewish War 1.420 and Jewish Antiquities 15.324.

10.

Lisa C. Kahn, “King Herod’s Temple of Roma and Augustus at Caesarea Maritima,” in Avner Raban and Kenneth G. Holum, eds., Caesarea Maritima: A Retrospective After Two Millennia (Leiden: Brill, 1996), pp. 130–145.

11.

Kathryn Gleason, “Ruler and Spectacle: The Promontory Palace,” in Raban and Holum, Caesarea Maritima, pp. 208–227.

12.

Josephus, Jewish War, 1.410.